Prototyping

Prototyping! It's foolproof, and almost never has bad outcomes!

Prototyping in coding means, roughly, “the process of writing bad code that pre-empts the process of writing good code.” In other words, it’s taking best practices and shoving them where the sun don’t shine (that’s that little place up near Lancre, isn’t it?) so you can rapidly code something that almost works, independant of all other variables. Usual procedure would then be to use what you’ve learned from the prototyping exercise to re-code the thing that almost works so that it actually does work. You know, decently.

As terrible and haphazard as the code behind the prototype will be, the finished product will be polished and professional, a triumph of well-organised project management and good coding practices, and there’s a good chance that the time you spent coding the prototype will pay for itself by allowing you to avoid all the pitholes the second time around. It’s like driving a really crappy car off the cliff so you can find out if you’ll survive when you do it again in your $200,000 Maserati. Only not like that at all. I may have screwed up that analogy. Whoops.

So when working in Species, it’s obvious that I made that most sensible decision of all time ever and chose not to prototype. Coding it twice? That sounds like more work! Screw that!

All those pitfalls? I ran headlong into each and every one of them.

But this did have one noticable advantage: the game served as it’s own prototype. Rather than being mapped from the start, it evolved by trial and error. My first vegetation system failed, so I rebuilt another on top of its decaying carcass, theifing the good and commenting out the bad. It was a process of revision and improvement over design, trial and error trumping any actual organisational skills on my part.

In a weird way, the process of evolution itself was what produced this game. And I’m going to pretend that’s what I was aiming for, because that allows me to continue in the blissful delusion that I’m a halfway-competant programmer for a little while longer. Besides which, it’s quite obviously the same approach the “intelligent designer” took when he was designing the human reproductive system, so at least I’m in good company.

But for the rest of you programmers out there, a bit of advice: PROTOTYPE! It’s worth it.

Qu

In his defence, he’s not as godawful a programmer or as insane a human being as he likes to portray himself as. He just enjoys participating in self-depricating humour… why isn’t my Maserati in the garage?

… Oh hell no.

Advertisements

, , , , , ,

  1. #1 by mold fabrication on December 30, 2014 - 12:16 pm

    Hello there! This article couldn’t be written any better!

    Looking through this article reminds me of my previous
    roommate! He constantly kept talking about this. I’ll
    send this article to him. Fairly certain he’s going to have a good
    read. Thanks for sharing!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: